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Why we do what we do: To decrease human suffering and to promote human values of equality and justice.

Activate Magazine is an on-line publication that focuses on Social Justice, Activism and Politics but also features Music Reviews. Some of the work here may come with a defiant sneer and others with brutal cynicism but it all comes with a sense of genuity. Not all the viewpoints or perspectives here represent the values or ideals of Activate Media. That being said we try to be fair in journalistic principles.

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S17 – Occupy Boston – @ FANEUIL HALL – CHANGE THE NAME/ OWS 10yr Anniversary | Occupy Boston

S17 – Occupy Boston – @ FANEUIL HALL – CHANGE THE NAME/ OWS 10yr Anniversary

Occupy Boston will be occupying Fanieul Hall with Allies and other advocates on September 17th at 5PM to shine light on the need to change the name of Faneuil Hall. It’s Time!
We will also be marking the 10th Anniversary of Occupy Wall Street in the most appropriate way. This will be a non-violent protest and will end on Sunday afternoon.

Concurrent Occupy Events

– We Want Democracy (Occupy Wall Street 10th Anniversary) FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2021 AT 5 PM EDT Free · Thomas Paine Plaza Philadelphia PA – https://fb.me/e/1Lf87NIwg

– Occupy Los Angeles 10th Anniversary Friday, 9/17 6:00 p.m. General Assembly Los Angeles City Hall (South Steps) – https://fb.me/e/WIjs14iK

– OCCUPY WALL ST 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY NYC SEP 17 AT 8 AM EDT
SEP 19 AT 8 PM EDT – https://fb.me/e/eytv2K5hR

Faneuil Hall is the 7th most visited tourist site in the world, that’s like 18,000,000 visitors per year. It is a 279-year-old market and meeting place once owned by Peter Faneuil, a slave trader. This tourist site was the Auction Block.

Long ago the property was given to the city of Boston and was named after Peter Faneuil. Today it is described as America’s first mall to tourists, they don’t know that human beings were sold there. Of the 143 businesses housed there, zero are owned by POC according to Kevin Peterson. Bostons previous mayor Marty Walsh refused to even allow a hearing on changing the name of Fanieul Hall. With a mayoral election on the horizon 51% of Massachusetts voters support a name change. It’s Time!

We invite Boston Mayoral Candidates to take a stand not only acknowledging the horror of Fanieul Hall but to allow the people of Boston the privilege of choosing to no longer contribute to the legacy of slavery.

This Action is a response to the City of Boston’s failure to accommodate the peoples wishes in allowing for a hearing.

For more information, visit OccupyBoston.org or email: info@occupyboston.org

Source: S17 – Occupy Boston – @ FANIEUL HALL – CHANGE THE NAME/ OWS 10yr Anniversary | Occupy Boston

 

 

‘Catastrophe’ Feared as 35 Million People Are Set to Lose Jobless Aid in 3 Days

‘Catastrophe’ Feared as 35 Million People Are Set to Lose Jobless Aid in 3 Days

“Millions will suffer as they lose this critical source of income and the loss of spending will suppress job growth.”

By Jake Johnson

Millions of jobless workers are set to lose critical unemployment benefits in roughly 72 hours—and neither Congress nor the Biden administration seem prepared to do anything about it.

“Around 35 million people (10% of the U.S. population) live in households that are scheduled to lose unemployment income.”
—Matt Bruenig, People’s Policy Project

Despite the ongoing threat posed by the highly transmissible Delta variant, the White House and Democratic lawmakers have provided no indication that they plan to prevent several pandemic-related unemployment programs from expiring on September 6, which—in a cruel irony—happens to be Labor Day.

The consequences of government inaction in the face of what one analyst recently described as “the largest cutoff of unemployment benefits in history” could be massive, both for those directly impacted by the cuts and the still-ailing U.S. economy.

As Matt Bruenig of the People’s Policy Project noted Thursday, the Labor Department’s latest weekly unemployment insurance (UI) report shows that “9.2 million people are currently receiving benefits from either the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program or the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program,” which were implemented last year to extend the duration of jobless aid and provide assistance to those who are typically ineligible for UI, such as gig workers.

“According to the Census Household Pulse Survey, the average household that is receiving UI benefits has 3.8 members in it,” Bruenig observed. “This means that around 35 million people (10% of the U.S. population) live in households that are scheduled to lose unemployment income.”

“These are not small cuts either,” he continued. “Based on what happened in the states that already cut these benefits, we know that around half of those on UI will see their benefits drop to $0 while the remaining half will see their benefits cut by $300 per week, which is equivalent to $15,200 per year. Those formerly on UI will also cut their spending by about $145 per week ($7,540 annually), which will have negative effects on the revenue and employment of the businesses they patronize.”

But even amid such dire warnings, the possibility of a UI extension has been virtually absent from discussions on Capitol Hill as Democratic lawmakers work to assemble a $3.5 trillion spending package aimed at achieving a range of longstanding policy goals, from major climate investments to Medicare expansion.

“The Biden administration has not made it a priority, and outside of Ron Wyden, you haven’t heard too many people in the Senate be willing to push on that,” Andrew Stettner, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation, told Vox, referring to the Democratic senator from Oregon, a key architect of the soon-to-expire UI programs.

“The unwillingness to extend emergency benefits—or even debate it—shows how inured we’ve become to plight of the unemployed.”
—Andrew Stettner, Century Foundation

“It doesn’t seem like right now there would even be 50 votes in the Senate” for an extension, Stettner observed.

Last week, Labor Secretary Marty Walsh and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said that President Joe Biden believes it is “appropriate” for the $300-per-week federal UI boost to expire as scheduled. Twenty-six states—each led by a Republican governor except Louisiana—have already ended the emergency UI aid, and the Biden administration did not try to stop them.

Subsequent research has vindicated economists who warned that—contrary to the claims and predictions of Republican leaders—ending the benefits prematurely would do little to boost hiring. A Wall Street Journal analysis released Wednesday found that “states that ended enhanced federal unemployment benefits early have so far seen about the same job growth as states that continued offering the pandemic-related extra aid.”

While Republicans have insisted that the emergency UI programs are dissuading people from returning to the workforce, analysts have pointed to the myriad other factors at play, including lack of child care and pandemic-related health concerns.

Dr. Rakeen Mabud, the chief economist at the Groundwork Collaborative, warned in a statement earlier this week that “amid increasing uncertainty in the trajectory of the pandemic, Monday’s unemployment cliff could not come at a worse time.”

“Millions will suffer as they lose this critical source of income and the loss of spending will suppress job growth, setting us back yet again in our efforts for an inclusive and equitable recovery,” Mabud said.

Painful enough in itself, the benefit cut-off will come just days after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Biden administration’s nationwide eviction moratorium, putting millions of people at imminent risk of losing their homes amid a deadly pandemic. The U.S. is currently averaging around 164,000 new coronavirus infections and 1,500 deaths per day.

“It’s going to be a perfect storm for a lot of folks,” Jordan Dewbre, a staff attorney for the New York-based community organization BronxWorks, said of the confluence of UI expirations and the end of the eviction moratorium. “We are still in the middle of a pandemic.”

In a series of tweets on Thursday, Stettner of the Century Foundation warned that “this cliff dwarfs anything we have seen before.” If the federal programs expire, jobless workers will be left with often-paltry state-level UI benefits or—if they’ve exhausted their eligibility for such assistance—nothing at all.

“The unwillingness to extend emergency benefits—or even debate it—shows how inured we’ve become to plight of the unemployed,” Stettner wrote. “With eviction protections ending at the same time, long-term unemployed workers are now vulnerable to lasting economic damage. Black and Latino workers have the least in savings built up to navigate this transitional period.”

“Congress should have the courage to reinstate benefits, especially in high unemployment states, if the Delta surge slows the recovery,” Stettner added, “and make permanent changes to UI benefits so that we won’t have to rely on emergency programs during the next economic crisis.”


Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0).

Source: ‘Catastrophe’ Feared as 35 Million People Are Set to Lose Jobless Aid in 3 Days | Common Dreams News

 

Roe v. Wade in Grave Danger as Supreme Court Lets Texas Abortion Ban Take Effect

Roe v. Wade in Grave Danger as Supreme Court Lets Texas Abortion Ban Take Effect

“Access to almost all abortion has just been cut off for millions of people. The impact will be immediate and devastating.”

By Jake Johnson

A draconian Texas law banning abortions beyond around six weeks of pregnancy took effect at midnight after the conservative U.S. Supreme Court did not act to block it on Tuesday, a decision that could have major implications for reproductive rights across the country.

While the Supreme Court could still grant an emergency request to suspend the law in the coming hours, the justices’ decision to remain silent Tuesday allows Texas to begin implementing what rights groups have characterized as the most restrictive state-level abortion ban since the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. Abortion providers estimate that the measure could bar care for “at least 85% of Texas abortion patients.”

“This is a full-scale assault on patients, our healthcare providers, and our support systems.”
—ACLU

Nancy Northup, president and CEO of the Center for Reproductive Rights, warned earlier this week that if the ban is permitted to stand, “Texas politicians will have effectively overturned Roe v. Wade.”

Signed into law by Republican Gov. Greg Abbott in May, Senate Bill 8 empowers private individuals to sue anyone who performs an abortion after the sixth week of a pregnancy—before many people even know they’re pregnant—or anyone who “knowingly engages in conduct that aids or abets the performance or inducement of an abortion.” Plaintiffs who prevail in court are entitled to $10,000 as well as the recovery of their legal fees.

By deputizing private individuals instead of state actors to enforce the sweeping abortion ban, Texas Republicans have made it extremely difficult to challenge the law’s constitutionality in court—a maneuver that other GOP-controlled states will likely attempt to replicate if the Texas law is upheld.

“SB8 will stop access overnight and will decimate the already vulnerable care infrastructure in place,” warned Avow, a Texas-based abortion rights organization. “Most importantly, it will leave Texans who need access to compassionate care and support services scared to reach out for help, and advocates afraid to help them.”

The ACLU—which, along with Planned Parenthood and other organizations, filed an emergency appeal to block the Texas law—said early Wednesday that “access to almost all abortion has just been cut off for millions of people.”

“The impact will be immediate and devastating,” the group continued. “Private individuals—including anti-abortion activists with no connection to patients—can now sue anyone who they believe is providing abortion or assisting someone in accessing abortion after six weeks… The law doesn’t just allow these lawsuits—it actively encourages private individuals to act as bounty hunters by awarding them at least $10,000 if they are successful.”

“This is a full-scale assault on patients, our healthcare providers, and our support systems,” the ACLU added. “This abortion ban is blatantly unconstitutional. We won’t stop fighting until it’s blocked.”

In addition to dramatically curtailing abortion rights in Texas, the Supreme Court’s inaction Tuesday could also indicate that the body’s six conservative justices are gearing up to attack established legal precedent that has protected reproductive freedoms nationwide. In its next term—which begins in October—the Supreme Court is set to hear a case involving a Mississippi abortion ban that poses a direct challenge to both Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey.

As Buzzfeed‘s Zoe Tillman and Nicole Fallert explained Wednesday, “Because of how the Texas case reached the justices, Tuesday’s order only affects that state, at least for now.”

“But in the Mississippi case, the justices are set to consider whether it can be constitutional for any state to ban an abortion before a fetus is considered viable, meaning it can survive outside of a person’s womb,” the pair noted. “Lower courts for years have applied Roe and Casey to mean that previability bans are unconstitutional, blocking the Mississippi law and other similar ones optioned in over 10 states during the Trump administration. The Supreme Court’s willingness to consider the case at all signaled a potentially massive sea-change in abortion rights.”

Jessica Mason Pieklo, the executive editor of Rewire News Group—an online publication focused on reproductive health and abortion rights—wrote in a series of tweets early Wednesday that “the Supreme Court effectively overturned Roe v. Wade tonight for folks in Texas under cover of darkness.”

“Instead of issuing a ruling blocking Texas’ six-week abortion ban from taking effect, the court did nothing. But in this case, doing nothing is actually doing everything,” Mason Pieklo argued. “Because by doing nothing, the justices said Roe is no longer good law.”

“If SCOTUS was interested in upholding abortion rights precedent, it would have issued an order that says basically, ‘Sorry Texas, Roe says you can’t ban abortion at six weeks. Nice try.’ SCOTUS didn’t issue that order,” she continued. “And by not issuing that order, SCOTUS signaled that the 6-3 conservative majority has no interest in upholding Roe as precedent. And it did so on the shadow docket.”

Our work is licensed under Creative Commons (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0).

Source: Roe v. Wade in Grave Danger as Supreme Court Lets Texas Abortion Ban Take Effect | Common Dreams News